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REUTERS/Max Rossi 2/3 left right Pope Francis holds Book of the Gospels as he leads the Easter vigil mass in Saint Peter's basilica at the Vatican, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Max Rossi 3/3 By Philip Pullella | VATICAN CITY VATICAN CITY Pope Francis, leading the world's Roman Catholics into Easter, urged them on Saturday not to ignore the plight of immigrants, the poor and other vulnerable people. In his homily at an Easter Vigil Mass in St. Peter's Basilica, Francis recounted the Biblical account of Jesus Christ's mother Mary and Mary Magdalene, filled with grief, as they went to visit his tomb following the crucifixion. Their grief, he said during the solemn ceremony, could be seen in the faces of many women today. "In their faces we can see reflected all those who, walking the streets of our cities, feel the pain of dire poverty, the sorrow born of exploitation and human trafficking," he said. "We can also see the faces of those who are greeted with contempt because they are immigrants, deprived of country, house and family. We see faces whose eyes bespeak loneliness and abandonment, because their hands are creased with wrinkles." Francis has used the period leading up to Easter to stress his vision of service to the neediest. On Good Friday, he lamented that many people had become inured to daily scenes of bombed cities and drowning migrants. During Saturday's service, he baptized 11 people, most of them adult converts to Catholicism, from Italy, Spain, the Czech Republic, the United States, Albania, Malta, Malaysia and China. On Easter Sunday, the most important day in the Christian liturgical calendar, he will read his twice-annual "Urbi et Orbi" ("To the City and the World") message in St.

Inc., publisher of The Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune, got a bit larger and rattier Thursday as the company alleged that a Los Angeles billionaire has consistently violated its rules by buying more stock. The letter from Tronc, which alleges a "cynical and transparent attempt to smear" the company, was sent to John Quinn, a Los Angeles attorney representing Patrick Soon-Shiong and is part of the cat fight between him and Tronc Chairman Michael Ferro, who himself as been buying lots more stock. As Ferro last year fended off a takeover attempt by Gannett, he brought in medical industry billionaire Soon-Shiong as a major investor. The doctor-entrepreneur originally took a nearly 13 percent stake in Tronc, previously known as Tribune Publishing, for $70.5 million and wound up as a vice-chairman. That made him the second-biggest shareholder behind Ferro but it appears, neither his investment nor title have carried much weight with Ferro nor a board stacked in Ferro's favor. In what now seems little surprise, their relations soured amid a mix of factors, including Ferro's clear desire to run the show, Soon-Shiong's belief Ferro was doing a poor job, Soon-Shiong's kingmaker aims and their respective moves to buy more of the languishing stock. Ferro also bought out a potential ally of the doctor, investor Oaktree Capital, for $56.2 million and solidified his hold, in the process raising speculation from some observers that maybe he'd prefer to take the company private. The board allowed Ferro to up his own stake to 30 percent but has resisted a request to do the same from Soon-Shiong, whom it portrays as not interested in the company's long-term health. It's also tried to dilute Soon-Shiong's influence via the Oaktree shares purchase and disclosing that he'd not be on the slate of directors for the upcoming annual meeting to be held in Chicago, where Ferro is based. Whether any of that is in the interests of shareholders beyond Ferro is unclear, and certainly not answered by Thursday sharp missive. The latest rhetorical fusillade, memorialized in a letter to Quinn from New York-based attorney Josef Riemer of Kirkland & Ellis, manifests the Ferro-Tronc claim that Soon-Shiong has been buying stock in violation of Tronc rules, specifically without the approval of the firm's general counsel.

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If Ahn wins, he would be the only Korean-American in Congress and the first Korean-American Democrat to be elected to the body, according to The Los Angeles Times . The L.A. Times reported his campaign spent weeks registering more than 600 voters at Koreatown malls and restaurants. His supporters also came through when it came time for fundraising . Democrat Maria Cabildo, 46, a longtime affordable housing developer and advocate whom the L.A. Times endorsed ข่าวด่วน มติชน , came in a distant third with 9.58% of the votes. The Berniecrats (Wendy Carrillo, Arturo Carmona, and Kenneth Mejia) all came in with single digit percentages. Half of the candidates were also immigrants or first-generation Americans, including Wendy Carrillo, who could have been the first formerly undocumented woman elected to Congress. There was also Kenneth Mejia, a 26-year-old first-generation Filipino-American, who was representing the Green Party.

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